Keysource shortlisted for CIBSE Building Performance Consultancy Award

We are delighted to announce Keysource has been shortlisted for Building Performance Consultancy of the Year at this year’s CIBSE Awards.

Now in their eleventh year, the CIBSE Building Performance Awards showcase the teams, products, initiatives and projects that demonstrate engineering excellence in the built environment.

The prestigious Building Performance Consultancy Award recognises consultancies that have demonstrated an outstanding contribution to the design or refurbishment of buildings to meet client expectations of performance, throughout its operational life.

Chosen by a panel of judges, this shortlisting acknowledges our drive for continuous improvement, innovation and knowledge sharing within the industry as well as the businesses commitment to employee development.

Jon Healy, Associate Director, Keysource commented:

“As the global requirement for critical environments increases, particularly within the data centre sector,  the sustainability and environmental efficiency of both new and legacy facilities is becoming increasingly crucial.

“To be shortlisted for this prestigious award is a testament to our contribution to the building community. We have an excellent track record in designing and delivering world class critical environments and it’s fantastic to be recognised as a leader in our industry.”

The winner will be announced at the awards ceremony on the 6th February 2018.

Keysource hosts ‘The Future of the Data Centre’ seminar

On the 26th October, over 30 guests joined us at The Globe Theatre for our ‘The Future of the Data Centre’ breakfast event.

In the first of a new series of seminars, Keysource explored the latest innovations, the challenges the industry is facing and changes to industry standards, such as the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

As was the theme throughout the morning, the data centre landscape is fundamentally changing, Keysource’s MD Stephen Whatling opened the event and set the tone for the upcoming presentations and discussions.

“Change in the data centre industry is constantly happening. What has already taken place in recent years has been at a pace that has excited and driven the industry, and brought many challenges. It’s clear with the evolving trends and innovations we’re going to discuss today, it’s not slowing down anytime soon and in fact the speed of change is accelerating faster than we have ever experienced before.

If you would have told me 10 years ago that the impact of technologies such as cloud computing, Internet of Things, and self-driving cars I don’t think I would have believed you, this is evidence of the fact we can’t predict too much of the future, but it’s important we try have a clear grasp of what’s emerging, and how to react and address this movement.”

So, what does the future of the data centre look like?

Keysource Enterprise Consultant and Head of Innovation, Richard Clifford, provided an insight into the latest innovations and trends that are driving defined infrastructure demands and the need for vast amount of data centres with improved performance, flexibility and efficiency.

As well as latest technologies and growing needs, data centre security is a hot topic at the moment, hitting the headlines a number of times in recent years. With legislation and regulations influencing the market the launch of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May 2018 will certainly drive further changes.

If you’d like to be informed about our next seminar please register your interest here.

We talk Edge with Data Centre News

Published in the September edition of Data Centre News Magazine our MD, Steve Whatling, explains why the growing demand for edge data centres led by Internet of Things, Smart Cities, and Content Distribution presents a number of challenges that data centre operators will need to be prepared for.

The data centre landscape is fundamentally changing. As businesses and the public sector continue to invest in the possibilities of always-on connectivity, the creation of a fully-connected smart city is no longer a pipedream.  From Barcelona – where public transport, parking and street lights are internet-enabled – to Bristol, which has invested in projects to monitor traffic and the environment, real-world pilot projects are gaining momentum.

This will result in a realignment in the market towards edge data centres, or fog compute, in the coming years to support this growing need for greater connectivity and data availability.

This presents a huge opportunity for professional data centre operators but one that is not without its challenges.

Whilst the decentralised data centre model has been around in various guises for some time, it fell out of favour for a lot of businesses as they sought to exploit the efficiencies of operating fewer, larger data centres. The emergence of the IoT will undoubtedly lead to a resurgence in its popularity. Only edge networks can provide the high connectivity and low latency required by the IoT and meet customers growing expectation for instant content and services.

Whilst the data centre has often been seen as an afterthought or as the last piece of the puzzle, as we become more reliant on technology this approach needs to change.  Over the years we’ve seen data centre deployment projects that have often been fragmented, with focus on available land and power. Once the location has been chosen, power and connectivity providers would be contracted to deliver the required services, which could involve disruption as these are put in place.  Moving forward, the location and deployment of edge data centres needs to be part of an integrated planning process which informs the placement of the critical facilities in relation to infrastructure and adjoining usages.

One of the major factors that needs to be considered is around data centre security. Cyber-attacks are increasing in both scale and frequency, while problems originating from physical infrastructure have also been found to be behind significant outages in the recent years. According to the European Commission, cyber-crime is costing €265 billion a year and some experts have predicted that edge computing potentially represents a soft underbelly for cyber security. These concerns will rightly mean that clients will expect data centre operators to be investing heavily in security and disaster recovery processes. As well as cyber security, the physical security and maintenance of these localised data centres will also be paramount.

Read the full article on page 32 of Data Centre News Magazine

Keysource partners to provide new data centre risk management service

Critical environments and data centre specialist, Keysource, has partnered with Corporate Risk Associates (CRA) to meet growing demand for risk management services in the data centre sector.

This partnership will offer in-depth performance and risk management services, to allow them to build up a full risk profile of their data estates, taking in a range of factors including location, operational performance and resilience, risk and critical processes monitoring.

Keysource says that the in-depth analysis will also advise clients on selecting the most appropriate data centre model for their business, through an in-depth understanding of the risk involved in each option.

Mike West, chairman at Keysource, said:

“Despite cyber security and data resilience becoming board-level concerns, there is a dearth of specialist consultancy available in the market to help businesses grasp and manage risks in their data centre estates. This joint venture will fill that gap by combining Keysource’s vast experience in the design and operation of data centres with CRA’s risk management expertise.

“We will work with clients to ensure that they understand where risk lies in their IT infrastructure, select the best options for new investment and mitigate any potential threats. With cyber risk set to take on increasing significance for corporate due diligence, this partnership means we are well placed to capitalise on a growing market.”

Jasbir Sidhu, CEO of CRA, said

“We have 16 years’ experience of providing risk assessments to critical industries – including maintaining national infrastructures in the power, defence and transport sectors. Our approach, which sees us look at the facilities, hardware and human elements of day-to-day operation, will enable us to ensure that the joint venture’s clients have an incredibly robust understanding of the risk related to their data centres.”

Interested in finding out more or seeing how we can ensure visibility across your data centre estate? Call us on 0345 204 3333 and speak to Oliver Goodman.

Are you asking the right questions?

As the data centre landscape changes, it is becoming increasingly more important to make sure you are asking the right questions and including all stakeholders when considering your data centre options. As we see continue to see the disconnect between design and operation, our Associate Director, Steve Lorimer, highlights why we, as consultants, need to challenge our customers in understanding what they are trying to achieve, rather than taking briefs at face value. You can read the article below or see the full magazine here.

Traditionally, the design of new data centres has been at the forefront of clients’ minds when procuring new IT infrastructures. Meanwhile the less glamorous maintenance and operation element is put on the backburner until, in some cases, after the build is complete.

In recent years this has led to data centre systems that are excessively expensive and unable to perform in the long-term. The industry has been relatively slow in resolving this but now, more than ever, clients need greater insight to help them navigate the wealth of solutions on the market while minimising costs.

Last year we aimed to do this through the launch of our specialist consultancy division. We recognised the need to join our FM and design and build offering as a service, that can guide clients in considering both elements right from the outset. Since then, it’s proved to be the panacea clients didn’t know they needed.

IT is increasingly integral to companies’ wider business strategies as well as their dayto-day operation. Even now, high-profile examples of server downtime are acting as huge reputational issues affecting stock prices and customer perceptions. This is only set to continue as businesses grow their reliance on big data, automation and systems underpinned by highly available systems.

Often end-users have a preconceived idea of what they want for their data centre system. From a design perspective this can be any number of in-house, co-located, cloud systems or hybrid solutions. Often they are blinded to new technology on the market and the latest cutting edge systems. Stripping the process back to the fundamental question, ‘what do you want to achieve?’ is more vital than ever.

Clients have never been faced with a range of options as broad as they are today. Navigating this with them can show clients that initial plans, and the combination of new technology they want to include, may be too expensive, or, in the worst cases, not meet their objectives when maintenance and design are factored in.

Too often the industry simply takes the brief from clients without challenging it. We now work with clients before they put design and build tenders out to the market – working alongside internal teams to develop a system that meets their needs, is future-proof and is cost efficient in the long term.

As one example, one of the biggest operational costs clients face in running their own in-house data centre is cooling and failure of this can result in significant downtime. Design teams will often aim to ensure that cooling systems are optimised across rack space but, when it comes to operation – FM teams need to be in the loop to work out whether different permutations of cooling systems will be easy to access and maintain.

As the industry attempts to meet best practice guidance set out by the BS EN 50600 standard, collaboration will become even more important. With both design and maintenance considerations in the guidelines, simply having one party at the table is unable to produce a cutting edge data centre any longer. Particularly if clients are tempted to overinvest in new technology without considering their current and expected capacity needs and the long term maintenance costs of these systems.

[x]

Contact Us

Please fill in the form below and a member of the team will be in touch shortly.