Keysource wins at Datacentre Dynamics Awards

Critical environment specialist Keysource – part of the Styles&Wood Group – has been announced as the winner of the Public Services Digital Delivery category in the Datacentre Dynamics (DCD) EMEA Awards 2016, for its work on the Metropolitan Police’s data centre estate.

Keysource was awarded the management of two of the critical data centres as part of the force’s wider strategic implementation of the technology transformation programme in March 2016. The company’s role included managing assets, capacity, efficiency, certification and compliance, as well as taking responsibility for delivering management and physical security management.

The Awards are part of a unique global series that provides worldwide recognition to outstanding individuals, teams and projects. An independent panel of industry experts reviewed all the entries for the awards before the winners were announced at the ceremony at the Hilton Hotel on Park Lane on the 7th December.

Mike West, Managing Director at Keysource, commented:

“We are absolutely delighted to have won the Public Services Digital Delivery category. We are proud to have worked with an organisation which has such a rich history and is a symbol of global excellence. This win is testament to the hard work and commitment of our team, quality of our people and our ability to manage high profile, complex projects.”

Keysource is part of integrated property services group Styles&Wood Plc, which provides a full range of professional and contracting services to some of the UK’s premier brands and leading blue chip organisations.

This includes designing, project managing and delivering a diverse range of property programmes including minor refresh works, conversions, shell fit-outs, complex refurbishments and specialist technical services to the data centre and critical facilities sectors. It also provides building intelligence systems, which specialise in optimising the management, running and performance of the built environment.

Keysource announced as Finalists in the Datacentre Dynamics Awards

It’s great news that we have once again been shortlisted as a finalist in two categories at this year’s Datacentre Dynamics (DCD) EMEA Awards.

 

We have been recognised in the Public Services Digital Delivery category for our work with the Metropolitan Police Service, having been chosen as a key partner in the transformation of its data centre estate, as well as being responsible for managing IT assets, capacity, efficiency, certification and compliance.

 

And Tom Blundy, an employee at Keysource since 2013, has been chosen as a finalist for the Young Mission Critical Engineer of the Year Award in recognition of his creative design expertise and hard work on key projects such as Jaguar Land Rover, Sky and Unisys.

 

The Awards are part of a unique global series that provides worldwide recognition to outstanding individuals, teams and projects. An independent panel of industry experts reviewed all the entries for the awards before selecting the finalists. The award winners will be announced at the DCD Awards Gala Ceremony at the Hilton Hotel on Park Lane on the 7th December.

 

Mike West, Chairman at Keysource, commented:

“We are absolutely delighted to have been chosen as a finalist in two fantastic categories. It is testament to the hard work and commitment of our team, quality of our people and our ability to manage high profile, complex projects. We thoroughly look forward to finding out the result at the awards evening in December.”

Banking: Managing the industry’s new emphasis on data

Steve Whatling, MD at Keysource, looks at the data challenges facing the financial sector and what lessons can be learnt from economic and political instability…

The financial sector has gone through phenomenal change over the past decade. If we go back 10 years to the mid 2000s, the banking sector was entirely different. It was all about growth, with some financial institutions putting together 25-year strategy plans confidently based on year-on-year growth.

The retail banking platforms were still relatively traditional with low adoption of electronic banking as many customers still visited the branch network to carry out transactions. The CIO/CTO was often not part of the senior team and the data centre was the responsibility of the real estate or property department.

Whilst banks have always been concerned with privacy and security issues at this time there was low confidence in the security of cloud provision so they retained total control of their operations. There was no real outsourcing model and, as a result, with the exception of one or two they decided to build and run their own data centres – and of course they could afford to! So they built huge facilities in anticipation of this predicted growth and invested heavily.

Ten years on things are very different. The industry’s promised growth predictions have proven to be incredibly flawed and recent years have seen the global system in crisis, with the UK government stepping in and rescuing some institutions.

At the same time we have seen a phenomenal uptake of electronic, online and mobile banking, which has created a greater emphasis on the importance of technology and data. It has also been used as an enabler to reduce headcount, creating much-needed savings.

As a result the CIO/CTO is now right at the heart of everything with the IT strategy fundamental to the business. The financial sector CIO/CTO has had to embrace outsourcing and consider cloud provision, but is now often responsible for the property and Facilities Management associated with IT too.

Looking forward it is unlikely that we will see any new data centres built in the UK for the financial sector for many years. The sector is quite simply overprovisioned after building huge, highly resilient Tier IV and secure facilities in the early to mid 2000s that even the increase in electronic banking is failing to fill. There has also been considerable consolidation in the sector which has further exacerbated the issue.

There are also some legacy facilities which are outdated and run inefficiently as unfortunately there hasn’t been enough investment available to upgrade in recent years.

Meeting todays IT demand

What we are seeing today is institutions looking at their data centre facilities and trying to optimise the asset wherever possible by seeing how they can be more suitable for their current requirements and potentially commercially viable. This might involve selling, upgrading or subletting.

There are a number of additional challenges facing the sector. A key area is how to keep aligning the business to its fast-moving and ever-changing environment. There is no doubt that electronic banking will continue to grow and more IT investment will be required to meet the needs of the influential Millennial Generation.

Whilst we will continue to see significant growth within the electronic banking area, the real opportunities are in the emerging countries in Asia and Africa. Their systems are often years behind and the industry in some countries is really in its infancy. They will benefit greatly from the lessons learned by the West and our experience and expertise.

This article originally appeared on The Stack on the 6th October 2016. Continue reading it here

Why local government needs a collaborative approach to data centres

At the end of 2015, the then Communities Secretary, Greg Clark, said council funding would be reduced by 6.7% between 2016 and 2020. Not only does this put further pressure on local government schemes, such as adult social care and child support services, it means councils are going to have to prioritise where they spend the money even more. Getting the most value from every pound is vital which means councils may need to look at alternative ways of approaching key areas such as data storage.

In my experience most councils need to upgrade their data centres. Typically built in the 1980s, the majority of the facilities I have come across are out-dated and run inefficiently as unfortunately there isn’t enough investment available to upgrade due to on-going government spending cuts.  As a consequence the majority of local authority facilities are a generation or so behind commercial standards.

To be fair few of us would have predicted the changes that have taken place over the past 30 years in terms of technology and at the time they may well have been leading edge. However with an increasing reliance on online data, they are simply no longer able to support the data storage needs.

 

The changing face of government-held data

 

Traditionally each district, borough or council tends to have its own on-premise server room, this is partly due to culture and also due to a concern that any other solution might compromise on security.

However the increase in the volume and the sensitivity of data being held means that this approach is no longer tenable and I would suggest rethinking this and finding a more cost effective and up-dated approach.

Initially the data stored mainly consisted of telephone numbers and addresses, but as society has become more digitalised the information being held online is more time critical, sensitive and needs to be secure. To offer a snapshot, councils now store census information, medical information, tax information, accounts and social care information on their servers. They may have invested in an IT refresh to handle the increase in data but what they haven’t got is the funds to upgrade the infrastructure. And it is only moving in one direction; as technology continues to rapidly advance and government funding decreases the budget available to councils, the data centres will only become more out dated and less able to cope.

 

Solving the challenge through collaboration

 

One solution is to create shared data centres between adjacent councils. For example if we were to take three adjoining boroughs of London, say, Islington, Haringey and Camden. These would join together and invest in one shared data centre. This provides a number of cost-saving efficiencies resulting in a secure, optimised facility at a significantly lower cost.

A bigger data centre doesn’t necessarily cost more to build or run as there is an economy of scale.  The increasing price of land per square foot means it is much more cost effective to group data centres together and by pooling resources it will save councils time and money. By implementing physical and logical security solutions within the data centre, each borough could be assured that their data is only accessible by them.

In light of continuing government cuts, an increase in governance and regulation of data, as well as the digitalisation of society, this problem is only going to get worse. Technology advances every six to nine months therefore it is essential that facilities are designed from the outset to allow upgrades in line with technology and capacity requirements with zero disruption or risk. When it comes to data centres, at Keysource, we recommend that organisations constantly review their facilities using intelligent monitoring and facility audits. Hiring a fresh pair of eyes that can identify and implement any necessary upgrades can help you achieve significant improvements in terms of efficiency, reliability and cost.

My advice to local authorities is to act fast. We are currently working with a number of local councils and assessing their range of solutions. However, as a template, taking into account the price of space as well as the investment involved in building and maintaining a new data centre, a more collaborative approach is a much more viable way for councils to face the data challenges moving forward.

 

Written by Jon Healy, Associate Director at Keysource.

This article originally appeared on The Stack on the 15th September

Keysource Ltd is acquired by Styles&Wood Group

Integrated property services group, Styles&Wood Group plc, has advanced its successful diversification strategy with the acquisition of Keysource Limited – a provider of specialist technical services to the data centre and critical facilities sectors.

The acquisition will enable Styles&Wood to expand into the growing data centre services market and provide new opportunities to broaden work streams with both existing and new customers.

Based in Horsham, Sussex, and incorporated in 1998, Keysource specialises in delivering engineering and technology services for business critical environments. The Keysource executive management team, which will remain with the business, has over 50 years’ experience working with some of the world’s leading organisations across a diverse range of sectors, including finance and banking, education and industrial. Keysource will continue to operate under its existing brand and the deal has been designed to provide it with a stronger operational and financial platform to support its ambitious growth plans moving forward.

The acquisition is in line with Styles&Wood’s strategy to diversify its service offering across key sectors and enhances the Group’s capabilities in technologies and critical facilities.

Styles&Wood and Keysource have an established working relationship as delivery partners on a strategic framework for one of the world’s largest banking and financial services organisations.  The Group envisages being able to offer Keysource’s services to its other banking framework customers.

Mike West, CEO at Keysource, said:

“This is a truly exciting strategic move for Keysource. The business is in strong shape and coming under the Styles&Wood umbrella will provide the company and all of our employees with great opportunities for growth in the coming years. In the meantime, it is still very much ‘business as usual’ in terms of client servicing and continuing to build on the fantastic momentum and performance we have delivered this year.”

Tony Lenehan, Chief Executive Officer of Styles&Wood, said:

“The data centre market is a sector we have been looking to enter for some time and believe it has exciting growth prospects, driven by a combination of macro and regulatory factors. Provision of critical facilities to this market will continue to be crucial as it grows.

The acquisition follows our successful joint venture with Keysource on an ongoing major banking framework and we have been very impressed with the team’s expertise and project delivery capabilities. With the prevailing market trend for the expansion and improvement of existing facilities, we believe the combined strength of both businesses’ expertise in working in live environments will make a compelling proposition.

Styles&Wood has a proven successful diversification strategy which has been instrumental in supporting clients across a range of sectors. This acquisition further reinforces our strategic vision and will enable us to broaden our service offerings to existing and new customers and I am excited about the future opportunities for the Group as a whole.”

Headquartered in Sale, Greater Manchester, Styles&Wood provides a full range of integrated property and project delivery services to some of the UK’s premier brands and blue-chip organisations. Its integrated offer includes design, building intelligence systems, facilities solutions and fit-out and refurbishment services which provide clients with the opportunity to optimise the performance of their property assets.

According to the AMA Research Data Centre Construction Market Report published in March 2016 the market for data centres is forecast to reach over £1.1bn by the end of 2020, representing annual growth of 3 to 4%.

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